Wednesday, 31 July 2019

8:15 AM — 2:30 PM

Registration

Location: Gran Salon Foyer

8:15 — 9:15 AM

Networking Breakfast

Location: Gran Salon Foyer

9:15 — 9:20 AM

Welcome Remarks

Location: Gran Salon

Senior Editor,
US Northeast and Mexico,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Hugh Morley

9:20 — 10:00 AM

Drilling Down:
IMO 2020 Takes Center Stage

Location: Gran Salon

Senior Editor,
US Northeast and Mexico,

JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Speaker Introduction

Hugh Morley

How will Mexico fare under the International Maritime Organization’s low-sulfur mandate that, starting in January 2020, will require all ships to slash their carbon dioxide emissions? The impact of slow steaming on port schedules, whether sufficient quantities of low sulfur will be available at different ports, and how much costs will increase for shippers on different routes are just some of the unknowns confronting the industry as this dramatic change gets underway. This panel will look at what it means for the Mexican logistics sector, analyze the possible snags to supply chains and whether the ocean carriers will be ready.

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Featured Speaker

Peter Tirschwell

10:00 — 11:00 AM

The Surface Transportation Battleground:
Truck vs. Rail

Location: Gran Salon

Senior Editor,
Trucking, JOC,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

William Cassidy

Commercial Director,
Traffic and Imports,
Grupo Transportes Monterey

Panelist

Fernando Bernal

Director,
Traffic and Imports,
Axo Group

Panelist

Carlos E Ortega Garcia

Assistant Vice President,
Intermodal International,
Kansas City Southern Railway

Panelist

Rafael Mercado

Director of Institutional Affairs, FEMSA Negocios Estratégicos, and former Director or Strategic Relations of Solistica

Panelist

Alex Theissen

President,
Mexican Association of
Intermodal Transport (AMTI),
and Associate Director,
Mexico Intermodal,
Werner Enterprises

Panelist

Humberto Vargas

Shippers sending goods in, out, and around Mexico face tough decisions on how best to get their cargo moved, the best way to ensure it arrives on time, and how to ensure it is secure. Both truck and rail have their challenges. Capacity in the trucking sector is tight, and rates are rising because of an ongoing driver shortage, new government limitations on driver hours of service, a requirement that double tractor trailers be certified, and other factors. Yet for all the problems with truck, which carries 85 percent of all cargo inland in Mexico, rail traffic isn’t taking off. Some shippers and ocean carriers say space on rail is difficult to find, and service reliability came under renewed scrutiny at the start of the year when discontented teachers blocked two key rail lines into the ports of Manzanillo and Lazaro Cardenas. Beyond the threat of disruption, some shippers say schedules aren’t frequent enough to make some routes viable, and equipment shortages mar service on others. This panel will examine how the two sectors can better meet shippers needs, and how they are adapting to Mexico’s rising cargo volume.

11:00 — 11:30 AM

Networking Break

Location: Gran Salon Foyer

11:30 AM — 12:30 PM

Port Productivity:
Pursuing Efficiency Through Mexican Ports

Location: Gran Salon

Senior Editor,
US Northeast and Mexico,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Hugh Morley

Commercial Director,
Contecon Manzanillo SA de CV

Panelist

Tomas de la Cuesta

General Manager of Port Promotion and Administration, Secreteriat of Communications and Transportation

Panelist

Luis Iván Gallardo Alvarez

Chief Financial Officer,
APM Terminals Lazaro Cardenas

Panelist

Martin Hurtado

CCO for Hutchison Ports Mex and General Manager of the Intermodal facility (TILH)

Panelist

Francisco Javier Orozco Mendoza

Managing Director,
Albatrans Mexico

Panelist

Emmanuel Sanchez Ochoa

Mexico’s 8.7 percent year-over-year growth in cargo volumes through its ports in 2018, and 7.1 percent growth in the first quarter of 2019, is increasing pressure on the nation’s port system. Truck congestion, slow cargo removal from terminals, and longer dwell times are among the challenges, as is the ever present security threat. Ports are adapting, but will it be enough, and in a timely enough fashion? The Port of Manzanillo, which was seen as operating at close to capacity during last fall’s peak shipping season, is extending the hours of its customs operation to provide 24/7 service. The port also is creating half a dozen storage yards a few miles inland to reduce the congestion and truck flow in and out of the port terminals. With a new Hutchison Group terminal scheduled to open in June, the Port of Veracruz expects to leave behind the ship congestion of the old terminal, where a shortage of berths kept ships waiting to dock. Still, the imbalance of trade through the ports means that others have capacity to spare, most notably the Lazaro Cardenas and Tuxpan, both with semi-automated terminals that could easily handle more cargo. In addition, President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO) wants to modernize two other ports, Salina Cruz and Coatzacoalacos, as part of a plan to improve the railway across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec — the narrowest point between the Gulf of Mexico and the Pacific — so that it can compete for cargo with the Panama Canal. Veteran port operators, ocean carriers, and beneficial cargo owners on this panel will analyze how prepared the Mexican port system is for the rising tide of cargo — after five years of vigorous promotion by former President Enrique Peña Nieto.

12:30 — 1:30 PM

Networking Lunch

Location: Guadalajara

1:30 — 2:30 PM

The Distribution Center Dilemma:
Finding Space in a Hot Market

Location: Gran Salon

Real estate company CBRE predicted in January that demand for industrial space in Mexico would grow by 24 percent in 2019, with the hottest areas along the US-Mexico border. The strong US economy, the revamped North American Free Trade Agreement, and a new incentive package aimed at boosting commerce in the border region on the Mexican side are some of the factors shaping fierce competition for space, real estate companies say. And that doesn’t take into account the rush by e-commerce retailers looking for space from which to send out line orders. Mexico’s national vacancy rate fell to 4.4 percent at the end of 2018 from 4.9 percent a year earlier, and space was even tighter in the Mexico City area, where vacancy rates stood at 3.7 percent. Some industry analysts say Chinese investors, squeezed by the US-China trade war, are now looking for space in Mexico from which to send goods into the US. All of which puts shippers and their logistics providers in a tight spot, constantly re-evaluating their needs and assessing what alternatives they have to fight for prime industrial space. This session will looks at where the market is going and how shippers are adjusting to the fierce competition.

Executive Editor,
JOC.com and The Journal
of Commerce,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Mark Szakonyi

 Managing Director Partner

Seko Logistics México

Panelist

Manuel Diaz

Executive Vice President and Regional Director, Mexico

JLL

Panelist

Gerardo Ramirez Barba

President and CEO,

O'Donnell

Panelist

David O'Donnell

2:30 — 3:30 PM

Logistics Technology:
Shipment Management Software and the Benefit to Shippers

Vice President,
Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Peter Tirschwell

CEO,
Fr8Hub

Panelist

Ohad Axelrod

CEO,
Nuvocargo

Panelist

Deepak Chhugani

Head of Enterprise Partnerships, Turvo

Panelist

Brian Cristol

CEO,

Tsol

Panelist

Erik Markeset

Location: Gran Salon

Shippers seeking to be better connected internally through technology have a growing list of options, among them standalone collaboration systems, including from technology giant Facebook, or collaboration functionality in logistics-oriented software. Use of such systems theoretically can solve a longstanding program for shippers and third-party logistics providers that serve them: the disconnect between logistics teams and adjacent departments that influence or are influenced by freight. The options include Turvo, Swanleap, and Facebook’s Workday, and they are steadily seeping into Mexican shippers. Each has its own challenges, but they offer the opportunity to link internal teams through online tools such as group chats, video meetings, file sharing, and an ability to link existing software to the tool to communicate about the use of those systems. Their embrace raise multiple issues, including the challenge of adopting new technology and the readiness of Mexico to fully accept them. Several new entrants into the market are offering different options, but none has emerged the market leader. This panel will explore how shippers can improve efficiency, and why the uptake has been sluggish.

3:30 PM

Closing Remarks

Location: Gran Salon

Senior Editor,
US Northeast and Mexico,
JOC, Maritime & Trade,
IHS Markit

Session Chair

Hugh Morley

3:30 — 4:30 PM

Closing Reception

Location: Guadalajara Foyer and Outdoor Terrace

STATEMENT OF JOC CONFERENCE EDITORIAL POLICY: All JOC conference programs are developed independently by the JOC editorial team based on input from a wide variety of industry experts and the editors' own industry knowledge, contacts and experience. The editorial team determines session topics and extends all speaker invitations based entirely on the goal of providing highly relevant content for conference attendees. Certain sponsors may give welcoming remarks or introduce certain sessions, but if a sponsor appears as a bona-fide speaker it will be because of an editorial invitation, not as a benefit of sponsorship. Sponsorship benefits do not include speaking on a program.